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Organizational Changes Require Good “Facilitation Skills”

Adrianne Geiger Dumond

When organizations go through change, good leadership skills are necessary to withstand the uncertainty. A leader with good facilitation skills can assure a smooth transition and support transparency. The skills are required for good collaboration and consensus building. A significant skill to this learning is the ability to ask good questions, which fosters meaningful group discussion. Involving the whole group provides authenticity to the discussion and helps the group think through difficult issues.

How it might work: The CEO has announced some major changes in policy or operations, and you are about to meet with your staff to clarify the changes. You are interested in modeling for them the way in which they may take their teams through the same process. You want to prepare all levels of management to explain and communicate the message. Here are some questions to help the process:

What are your questions or concerns about the changes? Your goal is here is to let the staff know that you are open to their input and are willing to listen. You might even choose to take notes so you can follow up later, or brief the CEO. Be sure to emphasize that all comments and information are confidential to only those in the room. This needs to be emphasized early on.

Who on your team will be the most affected by the changes? It is important for staff to clearly think through how the changes will affect all employees. This is your chance to help them realize the impact of change and personalize the resolution. You can assure them of your support and that of the organization’s.

Can anyone share with us how they plan to meet with their team for this? An open discussion about methods and strategies helps others to formulate their plans – providing learning for those more hesitant or less skilled. It is important to give affected people as many options and as much participation as possible.

What else can I do to make your challenges easier? It’s important for a leader to demonstrate humility and accountability, and not just authority in helping employees adapt and accept the resolutions to the changes. Patience and support are key leadership skills here – longer than one might feel is reasonable. We do not all change at the same pace. Keeping a positive attitude and being accessible also helps.

Author: Adrianne Geiger DuMond, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Don’t Forget to Plan for the Unexpected

Dave Blankenhorn

Often in our planning we forget to look at what might happen in favor what we want to happen. As we consider our goals for the coming year give some thought to what might upset your best laid plans.

What internal and external threats could disrupt your mission?

Internal risks could include unplanned expenses, disruptions in revenue, inadequate reserves, or IT crashes, internal fraud or theft, inadequate insurance coverage, hacking, or reputation risk.

External issues could be how to operate if there is a natural disaster, economic downturn, or regulation changes.

Identify the risks, measure the possible impact of each, determine the probability of the occurrence of the risk, then prepare a plan to mitigate those with the highest potential to damage your organization.

These should be then incorporated as part of your overall plan tied together with your contingency plan.

Continue to review and update your assumptions during the year. As the Boy Scouts say: “Be Prepared”.

Author:  David Blankenhorn, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Choosing Dogs & Board Members

The history of how dogs have been utilized to accomplish a wide variety of tasks is fascinating. The unique personality and physical characteristics of the breeds makes each one ideally suited for taking on some pretty demanding challenges.

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach
Michael Kogutek

One of the biggest challenges that ECofOC coaches confront is helping Executive Directors figure out who are good candidates to become board members. I came across this article by Hardy Smith, a Non-profit consultant from Florida. I found it to be spot on. Haley gave me permission to reproduce it here.” When watching the annual Westminster Dog Show, I am always intrigued by comments about each breed’s particular purpose and capability traits.

There are hunters, workers, leaders, protectors, and companions.

From water repellent coats and webbed paws for working in water to thick warm coats for cold climates to small bodies with short legs to big bodies with long legs, each breed is equipped with the right tools for getting specific jobs done.

Owners have depended on their dogs and their unique performance abilities for hundreds, and in some cases thousands, of years. Each breed’s record of competence has been well demonstrated.

Westminster Show announcers always stress the importance of considering a dog’s distinctive personality and physical characteristics as important factors when deciding which dog to bring into a home.

Some breeds are low maintenance and are great around children while others can demonstrate challenging behavior that requires patience and a commitment to training.

The consideration process for choosing the right dog can be applied to finding a new nonprofit or association board member.

What specific talents and abilities does your board need? What personality characteristics should be present to ensure someone will be a good fit?

What are your prospective board member’s demonstrated behavior and performance tendencies? Will patience and extra training be required?

Just as not all dogs are the same, neither are board members.

If you choose your board members with as much care and thought as you would take with choosing a dog, you will have a board’s best friend!”

  Hardy Smith Consulting http://www.hardysmith.com

Author: Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, ECofOC.org

ABC Test for Independent Contractors

Robin Noah

California’s top court makes it more difficult for employers to classify workers as independent contractors.

If you have independent contractors as workers in your business you need to review and take action to comply with the ABC test.

What Is the ABC Test, and How Can Small Business Owners Comply? The laws surrounding worker status have long been ambiguous. Deciding whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor has been largely left up to the employer’s discretion. Not anymore. Thanks to California’s 2018 court ruling, workers are now presumed to be employees. After implementing a new ABC test as law, California has greatly limited the number of workers businesses can call independent contractors.

 More than 20 states apply the ABC test. In one form or another. As the ABC test gains more and more traction nationwide, you may need to change how you classify your own workers. So, what is the test all about, and how will it impact your small business?

The ABC test is a three-part test employers must meet if they want to classify a worker as an independent contractor. The burden now falls on employers to prove workers are independent contractors. The ABC test makes it more difficult for employers to try to classify workers as independent contractors.

In April 2018, California’s Supreme Court adopted the ABC test following the Dynamex Operations case.

In the court case, delivery drivers who had worked for Dynamex sued the company for classifying them as independent contractors and not employees. Using the standards of the ABC test, the California Supreme Court ruled against Dynamex, saying that the workers should have been employees and not independent contractors. As a result, using the ABC test became law in the state of California.

Under the ABC test, a worker is only an independent contractor if they meet all three parts of the test: A) The worker is free from the control and direction of the hirer in relation to the performance of the work, both under the contract and in fact, B) The worker performs work that is outside the usual course of the hirer’s business and C)  The worker is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, or business of the same nature as the work performed for the hirer

The second factor of this ABC test means you can’t hire someone to perform similar duties to that of your employees and expect them to be classified as an independent contractor.

Many employers in California who have classified workers as independent contractors (1099) may need to convert that classification to an employee class. Employers will need to review their workers classification and may have to convert some independent contractors to employees.

Author:  Robin Noah, Executive Coaches of Orange County,  www,ECofOC.org

New Year Invites Reflection and Evaluation

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach
Michael Kogutek

On behalf of all the coaches at Executive Coaches of Orange County, we want to wish you and your family a Happy New Year. May it be blessed with good health, peace and happiness. We at ECofOC are grateful that our 150 clients have chosen to turn to us for individual coaching or for our Executive Director Forum (36 members), or for both.

For the past 16 years, we have been living our mission of helping nonprofit leaders  and managers become more effective, efficient and successful so their organizations can do more of their good work in our community.

The new year offers a time for us to pause and take an inventory of where we have been and set new goals for the future. The services of ECofOC may provide you an opportunity to move forward and up your game. Change  needs to be met with accountability.

Coaching  provides a  one-on-one relationship to nonprofit leaders. Our coaches help managers set specific goals and solve difficult issues from a nonjudgmental perspective in a confidential setting. Coaching can address virtually any nonprofit management issue, including board development, fundraising, outreach, leadership, management, finance, IT and HR issues, personal development and career planning.

Our Executive Director Forum is comprised of 10 to 12 executive directors facilitated by two experienced ECofOC coaches in monthly meetings using a proven process to guide the group to practical solutions for issues brought to the table by each participant. These sessions allow executive directors to test ideas and work though issues with a group of their peers.

We  hope you will consider getting a coach. If you are a manager with a non-profit organization in Orange County, you can apply here at www.ecofoc.org. The price is right; it is FREE! Our team of coaches are prepared to take you where you want and dream to go. The moment and power of change is now!!

Author: Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange  County,  www.ECofOC.org

Self Awareness: Major Component of Good Leadership

Adrianne Geiger Dumond

 

The Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) is an internationally respected management development business that has groomed executives and senior managers in leadership for over 50 years. Self-awareness is a major thrust of their week- long program. Executives spend ½ day being privately coached about the 360 degree feedback surveys, sent back home to peers, staff, and employees for their input.

CCL recently published a newsletter that encourages self-awareness and I will briefly summarize their key points.[1] The newsletter points out that often leaders are ‘out-facing’, meaning they are communicating with or influencing others. Learning and self-awareness seem to fall away in importance.

The four pathways to self-awareness are:

  • Leadership Wisdom: These are experiences you have had that can be applied to challenges of the future, taking time to reflect, what worked well, what did not.
  • Leadership Identity: This is who you are and how others see you in your personal and professional context. Some of this is a given – sex, age, race, ethnicity, height. The next identity is your status, or characteristics you control – occupation, political affiliation, hobbies, etc. But then, what about your inner core of values, beliefs, behaviors. Although these latter ones may vary over time, they still remain a significant part of your identity. Knowing your leadership identity may help bridge any gap you may have with those who think differently from you.
  • Leadership Reputation: This is how others perceive you as a leader. This was the information provided to the executives attending CCL in their 360 degrees feedback. Assessments are powerful tools for helping a leader understand their strengths and limitations. They are available through the Executive Coaches of Orange County.
  • Leadership Brand: This is the kind of leader you aspire to be, and the time and thought you choose to give to it.

I am biased in favor of the methods which CCL uses, since I worked for 10 years as adjunct faculty, interpreting the 360 degree feedback reports and know how helpful it was for the participants who took advantage of the opportunity. I urge you to read the article below.

[1] Four Surefire Ways to Boost Self-Awareness, Leading Effectively Newsletter, the Center for Creative Leadership, August 29, 2018

Author:  Adrianne Geiger DuMond, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Are you an effective time manager?

Dave Blankenhorn

 

A recent Harvard Business Review CEO survey tracked how CEOs spent their time over a three-month period. As you might guess CEOs have huge demands on their time and use a mix of strategies to manage these. However, they found CEOs could become more effective if they paid more attention to what happens when they aren’t crossing items off their to-do lists and planning ahead. Getting out of the “weeds” is important in every size organization

More time to think- CEOs need more time to reflect, recharge, strategize, and prepare for upcoming events. Many CEOs easily fall into the habit of being reactive not proactive. Time can help them and others in their organizations come up with new ideas and strategies to implement them. 

Attend fewer meetings- the higher you climb in the ranks the more meetings you will attend. The surveyed CEOs spent over 70% of their time in meetings. It may help to take stock of the types of meetings attended and pull back from those less strategic ones.  Also having a clear agenda and prepared participants will reduce the time by half. 

Delegate and move on– great CEOs try to surround themselves with a highly qualified and dedicated team. These CEOs then try to delegate as much as possible to this group. By empowering them you have more time to spend at the strategic level.

Author: Fave Blankenhorn, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

BE AWARE NEWS

Robin Noah

 

Labor Commissioner Launches Online Registration for Janitorial Service Providers

The Labor Commissioner’s Office has launched an online registration system for janitorial service providers and contractors operating in California to register annually as required by law.

Under the Property Service Workers Protection Act, signed by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. in 2016, every provider of janitorial services with one or more employees and one or more janitorial workers must register with the Labor Commissioner’s Office and renew every year.

The Labor Commissioner’s Office urges janitorial employers to quickly register. Those who fail to register by October 1, 2018 may be subject to a civil fine, as will any person or entity who contracts with a janitorial employer lacking valid registration.  

“The online registration tool will make it easy for janitorial employers to comply with the law, and will help us to hold accountable businesses in the underground economy that underpay their workers and evade labor laws,” said Labor Commissioner Julie A. Su. “The registration requirement is another tool for property owners to distinguish law-abiding contractors from wage thieves and to protect honest businesses from unfair competition.”

Janitorial employers are also required to provide employees with sexual harassment prevention training once every two years beginning January 1, 2019.

The Labor Commissioner’s Office has posted a registration search tool that shows whether employers and contractors are properly registered, as well as FAQs.

For more information, call the Licensing and Registration Unit at (510) 879-8333 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. or email dlsejanitorial@dir.ca.gov

The Division of Labor Standards Enforcement, or the Labor Commissioner’s Office, is the division within the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) with wide-ranging enforcement responsibilities including adjudicating wage claims, inspecting workplaces for wage and hour violations, investigating retaliation complaints and educating the public on labor laws.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may contact DIR’s Call Center in English or Spanish at 844-LABOR-DIR (844-522-6734).     

P.O. Box 420603 · San Francisco, CA · 94142-0603       www.dir.ca.gov

Department of Industrial Relations Release No.18-47  https://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/dlse.html          

Author: Robin Noah, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Future Nonprofit Challenges: Stifling Innovation

Adrianne Geiger Dumond

 

The United Way recently released a survey of nonprofits, identifying the issues facing nonprofits. I will list some of them, and then describe some behaviors that we, as leaders and managers, subconsciously do to sabotage innovation.[1]

Issues Facing Nonprofits:

  • Difficulty to change and be flexible;
  • Looking and thinking beyond what they have walking though the door every day
  • Being sustainable;
  • Lack of collaborative spirit; Many only see and value what they do;
  • Collaborate in short term because it seems convenient;
  • Flexibility, ability to adapt to policy changes;
  • Personnel turnover;
  • Clear succession planning.

 

Behaviors that Stifle Innovation

  • Not evaluating a creative idea thoroughly: don’t commit the necessary resources or systems;
  • Confining innovation to R & D;
  • Forcing structure and hierarchy;
  • Pushing a top-down approach;
  • Criticizing first; not praising the effort to be creative;
  • Rejecting ambiguity
  • Acting like a know-it-all.

Innovation surrounds us, even when we choose not to acknowledge it. Innovation supports the precept that leaders must be “transformational” (comfortable with change) rather than “transactional” ( conducting business as usual). I have a distinguished coach colleague, Ernest Stambouly, a high-technology expert who has written extensively about ongoing rapid change in technology, and what it means for nonprofits and social enterprises – now and for the future. In his blog “Modern Technologies Hold a Promising Outlook for the Nonprofit”, he shares how innovation will no longer be confined to corporate R&D but will be the power tool for the transformational leader in the nonprofit. I encourage you to read it at http://ecofoc.org/category/by-author/ernest-stambouly/.

 

[1] 9 Ways Leaders Subconsciously Sabotage Innovation, the Center for Creative Leadership newsletter, July 31, 2018

Author:  Adrianne Geiger DuMond, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

“Business Coaching and Mentoring for Dummies”

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

 

“ Business Coaching & Mentoring for Dummies” Marie Taylor & Steve Crabb, John Wiley & Sons,Inc. (2017)

The title of this book is a total misnomer. This is not a book for dummies but one for mentors and coaches who want to develop their professional skills. The authors spend time defining what coaching and mentoring are. They detail what the differences are. This is a comprehensive foundational overview for coaches and mentors. Resources and tools are explained to set up a coaching and mentoring engagement. The book is filled with business strategies, key concepts and effective techniques. There are written and verbal exercises are provided to help one take your client to the next level. What makes this book stand out from others is the detail spent on the psychological  dynamics that clients bring to the coaching and mentoring situation. I highly recommend it. You may want to consider purchasing this book as it would be an excellent reference book on your shelf.

Author:  Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC,org