Category Archives: Michael Kogutek

Choosing Dogs & Board Members

The history of how dogs have been utilized to accomplish a wide variety of tasks is fascinating. The unique personality and physical characteristics of the breeds makes each one ideally suited for taking on some pretty demanding challenges.

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach
Michael Kogutek

One of the biggest challenges that ECofOC coaches confront is helping Executive Directors figure out who are good candidates to become board members. I came across this article by Hardy Smith, a Non-profit consultant from Florida. I found it to be spot on. Haley gave me permission to reproduce it here.” When watching the annual Westminster Dog Show, I am always intrigued by comments about each breed’s particular purpose and capability traits.

There are hunters, workers, leaders, protectors, and companions.

From water repellent coats and webbed paws for working in water to thick warm coats for cold climates to small bodies with short legs to big bodies with long legs, each breed is equipped with the right tools for getting specific jobs done.

Owners have depended on their dogs and their unique performance abilities for hundreds, and in some cases thousands, of years. Each breed’s record of competence has been well demonstrated.

Westminster Show announcers always stress the importance of considering a dog’s distinctive personality and physical characteristics as important factors when deciding which dog to bring into a home.

Some breeds are low maintenance and are great around children while others can demonstrate challenging behavior that requires patience and a commitment to training.

The consideration process for choosing the right dog can be applied to finding a new nonprofit or association board member.

What specific talents and abilities does your board need? What personality characteristics should be present to ensure someone will be a good fit?

What are your prospective board member’s demonstrated behavior and performance tendencies? Will patience and extra training be required?

Just as not all dogs are the same, neither are board members.

If you choose your board members with as much care and thought as you would take with choosing a dog, you will have a board’s best friend!”

  Hardy Smith Consulting http://www.hardysmith.com

Author: Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, ECofOC.org

New Year Invites Reflection and Evaluation

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach
Michael Kogutek

On behalf of all the coaches at Executive Coaches of Orange County, we want to wish you and your family a Happy New Year. May it be blessed with good health, peace and happiness. We at ECofOC are grateful that our 150 clients have chosen to turn to us for individual coaching or for our Executive Director Forum (36 members), or for both.

For the past 16 years, we have been living our mission of helping nonprofit leaders  and managers become more effective, efficient and successful so their organizations can do more of their good work in our community.

The new year offers a time for us to pause and take an inventory of where we have been and set new goals for the future. The services of ECofOC may provide you an opportunity to move forward and up your game. Change  needs to be met with accountability.

Coaching  provides a  one-on-one relationship to nonprofit leaders. Our coaches help managers set specific goals and solve difficult issues from a nonjudgmental perspective in a confidential setting. Coaching can address virtually any nonprofit management issue, including board development, fundraising, outreach, leadership, management, finance, IT and HR issues, personal development and career planning.

Our Executive Director Forum is comprised of 10 to 12 executive directors facilitated by two experienced ECofOC coaches in monthly meetings using a proven process to guide the group to practical solutions for issues brought to the table by each participant. These sessions allow executive directors to test ideas and work though issues with a group of their peers.

We  hope you will consider getting a coach. If you are a manager with a non-profit organization in Orange County, you can apply here at www.ecofoc.org. The price is right; it is FREE! Our team of coaches are prepared to take you where you want and dream to go. The moment and power of change is now!!

Author: Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange  County,  www.ECofOC.org

“Business Coaching and Mentoring for Dummies”

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

 

“ Business Coaching & Mentoring for Dummies” Marie Taylor & Steve Crabb, John Wiley & Sons,Inc. (2017)

The title of this book is a total misnomer. This is not a book for dummies but one for mentors and coaches who want to develop their professional skills. The authors spend time defining what coaching and mentoring are. They detail what the differences are. This is a comprehensive foundational overview for coaches and mentors. Resources and tools are explained to set up a coaching and mentoring engagement. The book is filled with business strategies, key concepts and effective techniques. There are written and verbal exercises are provided to help one take your client to the next level. What makes this book stand out from others is the detail spent on the psychological  dynamics that clients bring to the coaching and mentoring situation. I highly recommend it. You may want to consider purchasing this book as it would be an excellent reference book on your shelf.

Author:  Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC,org

“Business Coaching & Mentoring for Dummies”

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

 

 

Book Review by Michael D. Kogutek

“ Business Coaching & Mentoring for Dummies” Marie Taylor & Steve Crabb, John Wiley & Sons,Inc. (2017)

The title of this book is a total misnomer. This is not a book for dummies but one for mentors and coaches who want to develop their professional skills. The authors spend time defining what coaching and mentoring are. They detail what the differences are. This is a comprehensive foundational overview for coaches and mentors. Resources and tools are explained to set up a coaching and mentoring engagement. The book is filled with business strategies, key concepts and effective techniques. There are written and verbal exercises are provided to help one take your client to the next level. What makes this book stand out from others is the detail spent on the psychological  dynamics that clients bring to the coaching and mentoring situation. I highly recommend it. You may want to consider purchasing this book as it would be an excellent reference book on your shelf.

5 Traits of Effective Bylaws

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

 

Bylaws can be intimidating and complicated. Benjamin Miller from the Community Legal Education Group,Ontario, Canada writes a very concise and pragmatic article on the topic.He has given me permission to reproduce this article.  No matter how good your bylaws are in theory, if they don’t get used, they aren’t effective. Here is a list of 5 key traits of bylaws that actually get used.

1) They reflect the realities of your organization. The rules and processes set out in your bylaws should reflect what you actually do as an organization. You may have read about some great practices other organizations have put in place. Even if you think that your organization should be working to put those practices in place, remember that your bylaws have to grow with you. Recommendation: You can’t draft effective bylaws simply by looking at the best practices of other organizations. You must start by learning what your organization currently does and values. If someone is writing your bylaws for you, even an expert, make sure they spend enough time familiarizing themselves with your organization.

2) They reflect the delicate balance of interests in your organization. Every organization has to balance the interests of many groups, including directors, donors, funders, members, users, and others. If your bylaws exaggerate the power of any of these groups, you are on the road to either conflict or having those rules ignored. Recommendation: Just because only a few people are actually interested in the bylaws doesn’t mean their say should count for more. You should reach out as much as you can and make consultations as fun and social as possible.

3) They are easy to navigate and read. People don’t have the time to read bylaws back to front to collect all the relevant rules for a particular decision. On the spot in a meeting, you must be able to know exactly where to look for all the relevant rules and be able to scan them quickly for the right information. Recommendation: Organize the sections of your bylaws according to how they’ll be used, e.g. AGM, Directors Meetings, etc. Use generous margins and lots of space between sections that express different ideas and topics. Have a table of contents.

4) They are written clearly and efficiently. If you can’t understand your bylaws then you can’t use them. It’s that simple. Recommendation: Make a special effort to write your bylaws in plain language.

5) They are designed for the beginner. Your bylaws need to be used by your most junior board members, who may have no previous experience with this kind of document and may represent a vulnerable community. In fact, ideally your members should be able to understand your bylaws to hold you to account. Recommendation: When writing the bylaws, ask yourself “could an average member easily use these bylaws to hold our board to account?”

Finally, remember that your bylaws also need to be legally compliant. Consult with an appropriate legal advisor to make sure your bylaws are not only useful but legal too.

*This list is based on The Drafting of Corporate Charters and Bylaws (2nd ed.) by Kurt Friedrich Pantzer. (1968).

Author:  Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

“One Minute Mentoring” Book Review

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

 

“One Minute Mentoring” Ken Blanchard & Claire Diaz-Ortiz, Harper Collins (2017)

This small and simple book packs a punch. Ken Blanchard, author of the best-selling “One Minute Manager”, and Claire Diaz-Oritz bring much wisdom to the table for managers and prospective mentors to take in. This book is for both mentors and mentees. Mentoring has been around for a long time but only recently surfaced as a leadership development tool in the business world. This book informs prospective mentors how to, including a systematic format. Blanchard talks about ways to keep the mentoring on track and focused. He explains what an initial meeting looks like for a mentor and mentee, “A successful first meeting with a potential mentor or mentee puts the personal before the tactical. The essence supersedes the form. Do your values match?? Do your personalities click?? Does the conversation flow??” The authors conclude with a discussion of comparing and contrasting the differences between coaching and mentoring. I recommend this book as a primer on mentoring and how it can be a game changer for all of us.

Author:  Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

An Executive Director Describes Her Coaching Experience as Transformational

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

 

At a recent ECofOC meeting, BB Maboby shared information about her organization and coaching experience with John Benner, an ECofOC Coach. She is the ED of the non-profit called  SmileOnU (https://www.smileonu.org).The mission is: “Beyond the basic act of eating, dental health is vital to a person’s overall health and appearance. Knowing that there are people who cannot afford to see a dentist, even when suffering from toothaches, loose teeth, or toothlessness, weighs heavily on us here at SmileOnU. Our mission is to rebuild the smiles of those in need, so that the rebuilding of their lives is that much easier.”

John has coached BB for the last three years. BB describes her coaching  experience with John:

“I remember when I first met John, I asked him why do people have coaches? He said, “because starting a non-profit on your own can be a lonely place”…

I can’t tell you how true this is. A lonely place that which words cannot describe.   It’s been almost 5 years now that I’ve started SmileOnU, a non-profit that provides dental-care to those in need. The first couple of years was all fun, I got to do whatever I wanted it was new and exciting, but then the hard reality of running a non-profit kicks in … The real stuff that keeps an organization running; growth and sustainability– and if I wanted to keep doing what I love; SmileOnU- I will have to sustained this somehow.

Now that I’ve been working with Coach John for a few years; without John’s knowing, just his presence alone that holds me accountable has been one of the most powerful forces in keeping me going at times. John’s reassurance and guidance through the tough times has helped me go through unexpected territories and hurdles of running a start-up non-profit.

John also provides perspective in areas that are uncomfortable for me, that often times holds me back from maximizing SmileOnU’s ability to grow and to serve.

One of my dreams was to be able provide dental-care around world. I’m not sure if I was able to take SmileOnU from providing dental-care domestically to internationally without John’s ability to hold space for me to think creatively and to think BIG about where I see SmileOnU’s place in the community without judgement. I’m happy to say we are now on the verge of sustaining SmileOnU.

Thank you John, for helping me with me create my dream, Sm:)eOnU “ Coaching impacts change. If you are interested in getting a coach, please visit the ECOC website for more information and to apply. The moment and power of change is now!

Author:  Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

 

Writing Effective E-mails

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

 

In this age of increasing technology, e-mail communication has become front and center. I found a terrific mini course on this subject at nonprofitready.org. It is 8 minutes long. The takeaways are: (a) avoid vague subject lines (b) Be personal  (c) Be visual (d) Be structured

(e) No big blocks of text (f) Is there a better way to communicate like phone call or in person meeting. The course advocates the use of the acronym SMART: Specific,Meaningful,Appropriate,Relevant and Thoughtful. I highly recommend the course.

I also want to endorse the website nonprofitready.org. It contains over 300 free courses to take in the NP sector. Many of the courses are from Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Europe. One gets a global flavor of the NP world.

We at ECofOC are strong advocates of the website. The micro-learning center offers courses less than 10 minutes in duration. It is a strong resource for our coaching clients and ED Forum Members.

Author:  Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, ECofOC.org

New Year Invites Reflection and Evaluation

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

 

On behalf of all the coaches at Executive Coaches of Orange County, we want to wish you and your family a Happy New Year. May it be blessed with good health, peace and happiness. We at ECofOC are grateful that our 115+ clients have chosen to turn to us for individual coaching or for our Executive Director Forum (32 members), or for both.

For the past 15 years, we have been living our mission of helping nonprofit leaders  and managers become more effective, efficient and successful so their organizations can do more of their good work in our community.

The new year offers a time for us to pause and take an inventory of where we have been and set new goals for the future. The services of ECofOC may provide you an opportunity to move forward and up your game. Change  needs to be met with accountability.

Coaching  provides a  one-on-one relationship to nonprofit leaders. Our coaches help managers set specific goals and solve difficult issues from a nonjudgmental perspective in a confidential setting. Coaching can address virtually any nonprofit management issue, including board development, fundraising, outreach, leadership, management, finance, IT and HR issues, personal development and career planning.

Our Executive Director Forum is comprised of 10 to 12 executive directors facilitated by two experienced ECofOC coaches in monthly meetings using a proven process to guide the group to practical solutions for issues brought to the table by each participant. These sessions allow executive directors to test ideas and work though issues with a group of their peers.

We  hope you will consider getting a coach. If you are a manager with a non-profit organization in Orange County, you can apply here at www.ecofoc.org. The price is right; it is FREE! Our team of coaches are prepared to take you where you want and dream to go. The moment and power of change is now!!

Author:  Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

 

“Ethos of Change” by Stambouly, Amazon 2015

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

Book Review by Michael D. Kogutek

Ernest Stambouly is a colleague  and friend of mine at ECofOC. He is a dynamite coach who delivers passion, innovation and change in his coaching process.

If you are looking for a book discussing the conventional and traditional ideas of change in individuals and organizations, this book is not for you. “Ethos for Change” is an out of the box body of work that will challenge your current beliefs. In the first part of the book, Ernest writes about change. He talks about his philosophy and psychology regarding change. Self disclosure about his own journey of the subject is refreshing, engaging and connecting. He sets forth three specific conversations that one must use to transform the change process. Most importantly he openly discusses how resistance is the major obstacle in this process. Legitimizing and talking out loud about resistance is critical. In discussing the dynamics of change, Ernest mentions how language and discerning mood states is very helpful. The second part of the book is a road map full of applied and practical interventions to make the process come alive. Ernest is under no illusion that change is easy. It is a state that is uncomfortable and uncertain Keep in mind that what he is proposing will take courage, a leap of faith and the willingness to confront your old beliefs.  This book will have to be read several times to internalize the concepts.  Reading this book is an invitation to change and transformation.

Author:  Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org