Ghosting Is Not Just a Halloween Term Any More

Dave Blankenhorn

It’s a recent phenomenon describing the practice of of suddenly ending a relationship without explanation. While this term frequently crops up in dating circles in recent years it has spread to the workplace where employers are donning the the role of jilted lover.

Ghosting can take several forms. A job candidate may ditch an arranged interview or even be a no show to the office on Day 1. More than that it can take hold among seasoned staff members who simply leave one day and don’t return to work. One staffing agency estimates it happens with up to 20% of white-collar workers.

Experts point to low employment and a plethora of available jobs as reasons why some job seekers and seasoned employees are willing to ditch working commitments.

This is obviously troubling. What can you do to neutralize any negative effects?

For starters consider launching a top down effort to be respectful to all employees and and transparent when communicating with them. By modeling positive the organization stands a better chance of staff modeling this behavior. It is also important to monitor employee morale to ensure some are not slipping between the cracks.

Organizations should also try to view things through the eyes of prospective employees. Some employers themselves are guilty of ghosting candidates by stringing them along for a time and then ceasing all forms of contact. Job seekers should not be left hanging indefinitely recognizing that that successful hiring is a two-way street.

You might consider a more user-friendly hiring experience. Some companies have launched programs that allow job applicants to track progress through each stage of the hiring process.

If you have been a victim of ghosting know that it can happen to anyone but seek to learn why and take steps to mitigate this troublesome issue.

Author: Dave Blankenhorn, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org