Coaching Mechanics (Coaching Series part 6)

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach

Michael Kogutek

 

 

Before we move into some new material, it’s a good idea to summarize what we have covered up to this point. As you consider selecting a coach, you need to think about a good fit between you and the coach. The previous sections on What Makes A Good Coach and “The Coaching Relationship” will serve as a reference. I will be discussing the fit in a future blog post.

I would like to discuss some mechanics to consider. The frequency of sessions is usually, at a minimum, monthly. My preference is to meet bi-weekly as this creates momentum, intensity and accountability.The sessions usually last an hour. The client and I commit to be on time. With technology, some coaches prefer to use telecommunication, i.e. phone or Skype, for sessions. I prefer to meet face to face for a couple of reasons. First, meeting in person lends itself to advancing the relationship.Secondly, meeting face to face requires effort, motivation and commitment from both parties. Most of my colleagues at ECOC share the same view. The meeting location is usually a neutral site, allowing the client privacy and confidentiality away from the work environment.

I use a client prep sheet to organize the client for the session.The client fills out the prep sheet prior to our session and e-mails it to me. This forces the client to organize their thoughts and also gets me focused and prepared for our session.

Some coaches use assessment tools when they begin to work with the client. Such tools as the Myers-Briggs Inventory, Wheel of Life and questionnaires are used to help generate data for the coach and client.

At the end of each session I try to set with a clear formulation of goals generated by the client. The client is held accountable for this with a set timeline. The client and myself then agree on a date for a future session.

Accountability is an essential ingredient and driver of this process.

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Author:  Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org